We want to live in a world where highly sensitive people are seen, heard, and respected. Where sensitives believe in their value and worth and where they can access the tools they need to step into their sensitivity with confidence and calm. We believe that high sensitivity is expansive and NOT limiting and that our trait is essential to making our world a more compassionate and caring home for all living beings. Sensitivity Rising Podcast for Highly Sensitive People Correcting imbalances as HSPs with Seasonal Eating for Autumn - Sensitivity Rising

Episode 5

Improving Highly Sensitive Health with Seasonal Eating: Autumn

Because we are intricately connected to and, in fact, part of nature, we can experience much greater health and resilience when we learn to live in a way that is aligned with the natural world as sensitive people.

One of the ways we can come into greater alignment with the changing cycles of nature is by making seasonal shifts to our diet and lifestyle.

It's easier than you think! Join Daphnie and Tonya as they chat about the many benefits of eating in season for our body, mind, and spirit as HSPs.

Mentioned in this episode:

  • Dosha Quiz This free dosha quiz will help you determine your ayurvedic body type, whether Vata, Pitta or Kapha. Ayurveda recognizes three body types, called doshas.
  • Seasonal Food Guide Use the Seasonal Food Guide to learn when and where your favorite locally grown produce is in peak season.
  • Fall Food Guide Download



Join Daphnie's Highly Sensitive and Strong Facebook Group Here!

Find Tonya Here!

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Transcript

Tonya 0:03

Welcome to the sensitivity rising podcast where sensitive people learn how to turn down the noise, and tune into their inner guidance systems. Hello, friends, and welcome to sensitivity rising. I'm Tanya.

Daphnie Leigh 0:24

And I'm Daphne. And today's episode is all about how we can improve our health, and nourish ourselves by following seasonal eating guidelines, along with some fall seasonal wisdom.

Tonya 0:41

This is such an important topic, I feel like all the topics we talked about are important though. But eating and season is can be so helpful to us as HSPs. And I can't wait to get into this topic. First, if you're a fan of the show, if you want to click the Listen link in the show notes to subscribe for free on your platform of choice. So you don't miss any of our great episodes. And now definitely, let's get into this, I want to really share all that you and I have the knowledge some of the knowledge that we have about fall and eating and season.

Daphnie Leigh 1:20

Yes. So you know, it really starts out with just recognizing that nature pulsates in rhythms and cycles. And so if we think about it, there are cycles of the day, there are cycles of the month and the moon cycles, we have cycles throughout the year. And then we even have cycles throughout our own lives. And because we are intricately connected to and we are in fact part of nature, we can start to experience much greater health and resilience when we start to learn to live in a way that is more in alignment with the natural world. So one of the ways that we can come into greater alignment with the changing cycles of nature is just by simply making some simple seasonal shifts to our diet and even at times to our lifestyle. And I think that that can also help us to experience some of the gifts that come along with each of the different seasons. So Tanya, what, what's your favorite thing about fall?

Tonya 2:40

For me, it's probably the food. You know, I typically tend to be kind of cold, cold hands, cold feet, lower body temperature. And so I really love warm hot food and rarely like to eat anything cold. So I love to make my own soups, which is super easy to do. I've learned over the years that it's much easier to make my own soup and taste so much better than the canned stuff.

Daphnie Leigh 3:15

So much better.

Tonya 3:16

Oh my gosh, I can't believe it. It's just the difference is amazing. I really love like winter squashes, I love curries, oatmeal. I love all kinds of tea. And so yeah, so probably really the food and you know, I struggle a lot with the colder darker days, especially here up in the Pacific Northwest. And so I try to focus on the things that make me happy the things that make me feel more nourished and warm. And those are some of the things that really get me through some of these colder darker months that are starting to starting to creep up on us. How about you, Daphne, what are some of your fall favorites?

Daphnie Leigh 4:04

You know, like you I absolutely love soup and if I had to pick you know, if we if it was one of those like okay, you can only have one thing. Soup would be my thing, especially if I can have different varieties. And I agree it there it's so it's actually so easy to make our own soups. I won't go too far into it. But one of one of my favorite discoveries in the last few years has been my instant pot as being my absolute most favorite kitchen gadget because I can make such beautiful like soups and stews and dolls and kids are using things really quickly and easily and they taste like they've you know cooked for hours. Yep, yep. So definitely those warming foods slike you I also tend to run a little bit cold but you know that just the colors of fall make me so happy and I love seeing the changing of the season and and I love that it starts to cool off and that I can get my scarves out and my I like to be cozied up and dribble clothes that make me feel very cozy and was like that extra cocoon. Yes. That's right. So those are definitely some of my favorite things about fall. And I'm sure you can relate in anybody else who's been living out on the West Coast of the US is that fall also means that we're coming, ideally to the end of fire season. And that's, that's been so highlighted these last few years, but But it always brings some relief knowing that hopefully the rain is coming and the smoke will be going away.

Tonya 6:07

Yeah, that's, that's huge. That's huge for us out here. That's very true. Yeah.

Daphnie Leigh 6:12

So when we when we really start to look at the seasons, and how we can live more in alignment with the seasons, I personally have found that the system of all your VEDA has been so helpful in in just giving me some really concrete tools that I can apply to my day to day life to help stay healthier and more in balance. And it uses the language of nature and it's so everything about your Veda is so intricately connected to nature. And that's something that really resonates with me. And I think for many highly sensitive people, because we know that highly sensitive people tend to be deeply moved by nature, and deeply nourished by nature. And so it's to me, it's a very elegant system that that gives very practical tools. And so I your Veda is an ancient healing science, it's the sister science of yoga. And, and there, it's it's built on a five elements system. So it uses it looks at the elements of earth, water, fire, air, and space, which is sometimes also just referred to as ether. And basically, each of these elements has different qualities to them, that can be thought of more like kind of their energetic patterns, as opposed to the actual physical substance, you know, instead of it, you know, the actual element of fire, or earth. And basically, within the system. It says that everything in the physical world, including people are made up of their own combination of these five different elements. And just as an example of that, you can look at some people and you can see that they they have more of that kind of heaviness of the earth and water qualities in them. And you might even see it in their physical frame, you know, that they're, that they're, you know, bigger boned and they're, they're stouter, heavier people. And then there are other people, you know, that are, you know, look like they can be blown away by the first strong when that comes by. And in fact, you might even you know, and they might be kind of really quick in their nature or even have maybe some flighty type tendencies to them. And you could say, wow, they, they seem to have a little more kind of Air and Space in them than my really grounded, you know, earthy friend over here. I remember I have a friend who, who I always thought when I when I would get in a car with her I was like, it's like moving through water. Like she had this way of moving through the world. That was sort of like flowing water. And yeah, and you know, she had a lot of water in her system. So.

So this is so there are these five elements in your VEDA? And basically, they've observed within the system that these five elements tend to combine in in kind of specific ways to form what they call the three constitutional principles or the three doshas. So a lot of people nowadays have maybe heard of the doshas, they're Vata, Pitta and Kapha. And, and these, these principles can also be applied to a lot of different things in life, including our own physical and mental constitution. And so, within your VEDA, there are different seasons of the year that are tied to these different doshas and fall is typically the vata time of year, it's the time of year where there is more of kind of that energy of air and space. And, and basically, they divide the year more into three seasons, as opposed to the four seasons that we typically think of. So vata season goes from, you know, a little bit later and fall into the early parts of winter Kapha season, which Kapha is the elements of earth and water, go from the coldest, darkest part of winter into the early parts of spring, or you think about that springtime comes around, and there's really a lot of moisture, that starts to be you know, depending on where you live in the world, you know, but, but you think of like, oh, the snows are melting in the spring rain has arrived. And there's a lot of water and heaviness to the season. And then as we move into the pit a time of year, that would be the hottest time of the year from late spring to early fall, which is primarily the, you know, fire is the element for Pitta with a little bit of water as well. So, is that clear Tanya?

Tonya:

That know for sure, for sure, yeah. And it's, you know, or your Veda is a very, there's a lot of details to it, right. And so we're just really kind of scratching the surface here, just to lay a really brief kind of foundation. So we can, so we can introduce kind of some of the elements of what fall contains, right, so we can move into that. The ideas and the and the thoughts about eating around this time of year and why it is so important to to have some of those grounding, grounding, warming foods, right? As we move into the season, when things are starting to get drier, right. So we can even looking at a physical thing that most of us will see right is the leaves changing, and then drying up, right and crunching on the ground. So there's your, you know, a very real explanation or visual, right, that we can all have about this time of year. It's literally, you know, shriveling up drawing and laying on the ground. So you know, and that's the season we get into. All right for me, depending on where you live, if you're indoors, and it's you know, you have the heat on all the time that's really really drying as well. Me especially so skin, all of that kind of stuff. It's extremely drying for me. And so yeah, so this is why I love this subject because we can change so much about how we feel right? Mind Body Spirit through what we eat.

Daphnie Leigh:

Absolutely. And so basically each each of these three different doshas have their own unique qualities. And by understanding them, then we can have these tools that can help us to stay healthier, because then we understand what little changes we can make to our diet or to our daily lifestyle, to start to correct any of the imbalances that show up in our body and mind. And, and so you know if if all of this is completely new to you, or if the doshas are new to you, for our listeners, and you'd like to learn more about what your own dosha your own primary dosha might be, we'll put a link down in the show notes to a quiz that can help you determine that, but baseball Yeah, and so basically, fall and early winter are typically considered the Valta time of year and as Tonya was starting to say, they have this time of the year has some certain characteristics, it tends to be a little colder, lighter, drier, there are two vata there are like rough, subtle and mobile qualities as well. So let's I want to break that down a little to give you some concrete examples of how those things might show up during the fall season. So Tonya, like you were saying is that, you know, it as the heat of summer, you know, starts to fade, the temperature starts to drop, and, you know, the leaves start to change on the trees. And we start to feel that crispness in the air, I actually remember very clearly a few weeks back, when it was the first morning that I had to get up and leave really early for work. It was the first time day of the season where I went out and I was like, ah, there's that really Chris, the light feeling in the air fall, fall is truly coming. And so there's, there's literally, it becomes a colder time of the year, as the temperature starts to change. And with the colder temperature, the air literally starts to feel lighter. So that lightness is another common quality of vata. And, you know, when you think about, like, if you've ever gone to a really, I flew to Texas this summer, and this fall, and when I got there, you know, you step off the plane, and it's even at 10 o'clock at night, I felt like I was stepping into like a hot shower stall or something, it was so heavy and humid and hot. And so as it as it cools off, and you get that lightness in the air, and literally the plants become lighter, as their leaves start to dry up and shrivel and die off for the for the winter. And so then you have that dry, rough quality to the season that, you know, a lot of times we'll start to have some more winds blowing in that are bringing those cooler temperatures. And it can bring more of a dryness to the air. As as those leaves are all getting blown off the trees so they can crunch under our feet. And that's another thing I love about fall like I love walking around. And there's the crunchiness of the leaves on the ground and the beautiful visual of the leaves changing color. So So yeah, so we've covered there's the coldness, the lightness, dryness, roughness, and there is a mobile quality. So Vata is all about movement. That's one thing that really characterizes vata. And if you think about it, like in the fall, especially as we're heading into fall, things really swing back into motion, if you have kids, like the kids head back to school, we have like the, the fall harvest season that arrives, it you know, when we live really close to close to the Earth that summer, a lot of times it can have that kind of hot lazy days of summer where you just kind of need to retreat from the heat. And,

and then, you know, fall comes and it's like, oh, it's time to spring into action, those seed seeds that we planted in the, in the spring and in the summer are now ready to be harvested in the fall. And, and there can also be a subtle quality. So vata has a really subtle quality that the space element brings in, that can really kind of increase our own sensitivity. So meaning that if you find yourself like being more sensitive, maybe even recognizing that you have a little more access or you're feeling your emotions a little more or you're you're having new insights into things or fall time, you know, like new ideas can start percolating to the surface and, and the flip side of that, is that if we're if we're out of balance, if we've been pushing too hard, maybe if we really like pushed really hard through the heat of summer, that we can get into fall and suddenly find ourselves feeling very ungrounded feeling kind of flighty or even having an increase in anxiety as that cold, dry, fast movement of fall comes in? Does that make sense?

Tonya:

Yeah, it sure does. Yep. Yep.

Daphnie Leigh:

And so Tonya Rothe Do you want to talk about maybe some of the ways that we could can use our understanding of these characteristics to maintain more of our own balance? Yeah,

Tonya:

I mean, I think one of the most important healing principles in our Veda is the idea that, like, increases, like, and that opposites balance. And so really, practically, that just means that, you know, if you're experiencing that excess of heat in your body, for example, that you would want to be in maybe a cooler environment, or you would want to apply cold either through, you know, what you're in taking in your body. So eating cooler foods, and avoiding like things like spices, you know, spicy warming things, for example, because putting the cold right to the heat is going to bring you a little bit more into balance. So I think, pretty self explanatory when it comes to something like that, but also, when, like increases, like, right, so we, a lot of times are attracted to the things that we're already feeling. So, you know, if you're, like, for me, example, I have a lot of vata in my body. And so one of the, one of my favorite snacks of all time is popcorn, right, which is very dry. You know, so it's, so I have that element, a lot of that element in my body, so I'm attracted to that, to that dry airy food,

Daphnie Leigh:

yeah, my airy dry.

Tonya:

That's something that I really need to keep an eye on, right? That just because I'm craving it, it doesn't necessarily mean that it's what my body needs. So yeah, so really thinking about how, you know, like, increases like, and that opposites are oftentimes what we need to balance. So since fall is cold, light and dry that time of year, that we can stay more imbalanced and help ourselves avoid some of the the common things that come up for us this time of year, right, the common ailments, like you know, cold and flu season, all that kind of stuff. By finding ways to get warm, get grounded, finding ways to slow down, add moisture to the things that we eat. So instead of eating the popcorn, you know, we would maybe go for a soup instead or something that's, you know, more hearty and more emphasis up from the inside out. So, and also, you know, creating boundaries and study routines, I find that, especially as the days get colder and darker, and I struggle more with, with seasonal depression and things like that, which is something I struggle with, up here, in this part of the, of the world, that having having a steady routine is really, really helpful to me, kind of keeping a rhythm in the times that I eat, especially meal times, trying to eat around the same time every day. And, you know, setting up those boundaries as well that I don't over commit to things and, and just really being mindful of, you know, what I'm putting in my body and noticing how that's affecting me overall, really helps me to stay grounded and more focused.

Daphnie Leigh:

Yeah, and that's interesting that you brought that up, because just because, you know, I've spent some time learning about Ayurveda, and one of the things that I understand about vata, because that's my primary dosha as well and is that we tend to really resist routines.

Tonya:

And yet, right and 10%

Daphnie Leigh:

Yes, and so there's that part of me that it's like, sometimes I don't want to be bothered with eating or taking the time to do it. And yet every fiber in my being, I know that what I need to do is to stop and nourish myself that I can feel myself becoming less and less grounded. And you know, and even getting to the point where if I, if I don't eat on a regular schedule, sometimes it's hard to even think clearly enough to make a decision to feed myself. So it is having that steadiness is so helpful, even if we resist it. And sometimes those of us who resisted the most need it the most to because we're already ungrounded. Yeah, by nature. Yep.

Tonya:

And it is not easy. Yes. It's easy at all. It's a it's a constant battle. It's a constant battle. Yep, for sure, for me.

Daphnie Leigh:

And you know, so one of the really great things about being highly sensitive, is that we do tend to be much more aware of the subtle shifts that are happening both around us, and inside of us in our own body. And we can use this awareness to help our still selves to stay healthier, if we learn to apply, you know, some really basic healing principles in our own life, that if we, if we, when we notice that we're becoming ungrounded, if instead of just ignoring it, because we're super caught up, and whatever we're interested in at the moment, that we stop, and we pay attention to that. And then we ask ourselves, like, what do I really need right now, ah, I just needs a nourishing food. And I maybe need to rest for a moment that then we don't have to wait until we've gotten ourselves completely overwhelmed. Before we stop and do what we really need. Yep. And this task, at this time of the year, some of the most common imbalances that start to happen for a wide range of people are that it is not uncommon to start to experience more anxiety, more overwhelm this time of the year, insomnia, you mentioned, like cold and flu season starts to move in. It's and you mentioned dryness. So dry skin is really common this time of the year. With that we might also get stiffer joints, constipation, low energy, all of these things are kind of classic vata imbalances. And, yeah, and so with that whole idea of like, increases like, well, if you're already kind of a little bit more of a vata constitution, and then we move into the vata time of the year, you might have to pay double attention to how can you bring more warmth, more moisture, and more groundedness into your your body and into your daily routine to stay better balanced? And one thing you know, I think it's really important to point out is that yes, fall is kind of the classic vata season. However, these things absolutely vary depending on where you live, because those same kind of cold dry and expensive qualities can show up at other times of the year. And, and depending on where you live in the world, it's going to happen at different times. So So with with all of this, so we've talked a little bit about your Veda and this being the season of vata, what does this have to do with seasonal eating? Tanya, you want to talk about that?

Tonya:

Yeah, the you know, and the, there's so many, so many countless beautiful things about ru VEDA, right, but something that I really love is that you know, our your VEDA considers seasonal routines and seasonal eating to just be an important part of maintaining our overall health right year round. And so I think something that's really cool about it is that many of us adopt seasonally kind of appropriate habits without even really being conscious of it. So you know, in summer, we will crave if it's, you know, if it's hot, really hot, where we live, we might crave lighter cooling foods like salads, watermelon, all these kind of, you know, things that are in season for the summer, right? They're super abundant, you can go and get all kinds of stone fruits and things like that, which is one something that I love about summer is all the different kinds of fruit that you can get. And so they're perfect. It anecdotes right to the heat, the intensity of summer. But by the time we get to this time of year, you know, October, November, we're ready to start baking. Yes, everything pumpkin starts to pop up everywhere. And eating all those, you know, kind of hearty foods, grounding soups, all the you know that that Dafina loves so much. And so in a lot of ways, we're already kind of in that, in that idea in that in that rhythm with nature anyway, without even really having to think about it too much, right. So we're naturally trying to balance out the dry light, you know, kind of erratic nature of fall. And it is also so helpful to eat in season, right and locally if we can. So I have a website that I turned to a lot of times, it's seasonal food guide.org. And if you're listening in the US, it breaks down by state, and both the early and late parts of each month on what produce is in season near you. So you can put in, you know, you can put in New York, early October, and it will give you ideally right in your area, what kind of foods what kind of produce is going to be in season for you.

Daphnie Leigh:

Oh, that's such a great resource.

Tonya:

It is. It's free. It's amazing. And I'll put a link for that website in the show notes for people to take a look at for sure. And seasonal food that's purchased. And we're talking about produce here. You know, that it's when it's purchased and consumed around the time that it's harvested, right? It has the most nourishment for us, right. So the longer something sits on a shelf, the more nutrients it's going to lose over time, unfortunately. So if it is available to you, seasonal food is fresher, it's tastier, it's more nutritious. And it's also a lot of times less expensive than food that you consume out of season. So, for example, you know, strawberries, even though pretty much everybody loves to eat strawberries, right, we can eat them year round, but the best time to eat them is when they're purchased shortly after they're harvested. So just kind of thinking about it in that terms of you know, what, what do you see that's more abundant in the stores around you at different times of the year. And those are, those are going to be the foods that are typically going to be in season for you.

Daphnie Leigh:

You know, one thing that's really cool that I came across in the past was just this idea that, you know, if you think about it, for, for so long with humans that you know, you eat what we were hunters and gatherers, and we ate whatever food was available seasonally until we hunker down and started growing food and all of that. And then we got better and better at storing food. And so, you know, then it got to the point now where we can ship full food all over the world. So we can eat just about anything at any time. But interestingly, when when they look like really closely at our digestive system, and all of that, that we actually create different digestive enzymes at different times. And so for example, they found that there are certain times of the year that we are literally able to better digest and utilize the nutrients and things like grain, for example, than we are at other times of the year. And when you think about that, it's like wow, there's so much that we don't know about how our bodies work, that are completely in sync with nature and what nature provides. And again, and I think this is one way that we can we can just really there are simple ways that we can reconnect with the natural world that we are all a part of, by making these subtle shifts. That that just, you know, to honor that connection, which I think can only help us in this day and age and so you know, as health coaches, you know, you and I we both know that it's really important to have variety in our diet. Right, you know, they all eat the rainbow and variety. And yet, you know, I talked to people who are like, but I only like this, this and this and, and that, as we just talked about, you know, we can go to most grocery stores, at least in the US and, and buy like this same handful of different kinds of fruits and vegetables all year round because they can just ship them in from wherever they can grow them at that time of the year. And that doesn't encourage us to have as much variety in our diet. Because if we're eating bell peppers and tomatoes all year round, because we can buy them and strawberries, you know? Yeah. Is that is that really good for us. And, and another thing that kind of goes along with that is that when we think about getting variety in our diet, it doesn't mean that we have to eat a whole bunch of different foods every single day, or at every single meal, or even every single month. But a really easy way to start having more variety in our diet is to eat seasonally. Because if you think about it in nature, it seems like it would be very natural to gorge, so to speak, and eat a whole lot of one kind of food or a small handful of foods that are available at that time of the year. And when the supply runs out, you start eating the next thing that that is now in season. Yep. And that way, we can actually get a lot of variety in our diet, while keeping it simple. It doesn't have to get complicated. And in fact, we don't want to overwhelm our system our body by trying to digest a ton of different kinds of foods all the time, each and every day. So one of one of my favorite approaches to this because, um, you know, I live a busy life. And I have a family and I work and I like to streamline things and keep them simple. So I keep a notebook in my kitchen, where I keep kind of a list of my favorite recipes, that I keep some sheets that are broken up by seasons that are my favorite Seasonal Recipes. And Tanya, I don't know about you, but do you know what it's like when the weather starts to change? And you suddenly find yourself trying to remember like, oh, what what do I usually wear at this time of the year? Like what's my what are my favorite outfits when it gets when I suddenly need to start putting socks on to go to work again.

Tonya:

Or you know, thinking everything's fine when you're in the house and you walk outside and you realize, oh, I need a jacket

Daphnie Leigh:

when exactly when I'm like a huge fan of things like the capsule wardrobe where I have a couple of outfits and I just rotate those outfits all season long. But then when the next season comes, I always have to remind myself, what do I usually wear now that I got real cozy, and that this small handful of outfits. So food can be kind of the same way. And I love when fall rolls around because it does remind me It's soup time again. Because usually as I start to go into the heat of the summer, as much as I love soup, I find that my desire for making an eating soup starts to drop off some in the summer not completely, because you will find me eating a bowl of soup. Yeah, and every season, it's just a lot less often in the summertime. So I keep that list for myself of like, favorite fall meals, versus my favorite summer meals. And and that makes it easy to kind of rotate through and get more variety. So I'm not eating the same five meals all year round. Yeah. And and I like to do that based on what's available in season locally. And one of the best ways that I found and I've been very fortunate for where I live that I have access to these things. But if you live and have access to a local farmers market, that is a great way to both find out what foods are in season. But also I mean the people who are out there growing those foods. They love to talk about what they spend their life doing. And so you might walk through a farmers market and see something that even if you know what it is you're like, Oh, I've never cooked with that before. What do you do with that? Well, oftentimes you can go talk to the person who owns that stand and they're more than happy because you better believe you've bet they've got some recipes, and they know ways to cook those foods that they grow. And so they're totally excited to share with you their favorite ways of preparing things. And so that can be a really fun way to try new things and get to know other people in your community and what foods are, are available locally. I've also lived in places where I've joined the local CSAs. What it's like Community Supported Agriculture, I think is what that stands for, but where you can go and for a monthly fee, or a yearly fee, that they'll provide you, you know, a box of food each week with locally grown produce. And that can be a great way of getting more variety in your diet and eating seasonally. So yeah, that's it doesn't have to be complicated. We don't have to eat, you know, the whole rainbow every day, or even every week. But boy, we want to get that rainbow in every year.

Tonya:

Way to look at it. I like that. I like that every year. Yeah, a lot less pressure.

Daphnie Leigh:

Yes. So you know, you don't, you might eat a lot of red with tomatoes and strawberries in the summertime. And then you know, you can move on to a different color. Now it's time for Orange when the fall rolls around, because we've got up our pumpkins and so yeah, so you have anything more you want to say about that right now, Tanya,

Tonya:

I think that just um, you know, especially, we can talk about some of the some of the foods like smore, specifically. So you know, at this time of year where we both live in the Pacific Northwest, it's a great time for apples, pears, things like that in early fall, it can be good to eat these fruits raw, that help us kind of transition out of the summer season. And then as we slowly kind of get ready to digest into the heavier foods, so it can be a good time to kind of start out but then you know, as the season progresses, and it starts to get a little bit colder, then we can move into kind of cooking some of these foods. So preparing, you know, apples, adding them to our oatmeal, for example, in the morning, having it you know, a little bit softer, warmer cooked. That's my, that's my preferred way to eat apples, for example. Sometimes I have a really hard time digesting them raw because there's supply. So yeah, so even if you're struggling with something like that, if an eating apple gives you an upset stomach, you know, try adding it to something and then that's cooked. Yeah, yeah, a lot easier on your digestive system for sure.

Daphnie Leigh:

Absolutely. And you can add things like Yeah, cuz I know that as we come out of the heat of summer that that it is kind of drier and a little bit more cooling to eat some raw apples, if that works well for you. And it can, you know, help help with your gut and kind of clear clear things out of your system. But then as it's getting cooler and drier outside, we can start to maybe stew those apples. And we can stir them up and cook them with things like cinnamon and ginger, which are really warming spices that also help to support our digestion. Because a lot of times as it gets colder, our digestion starts to get weaker, as well. And so we can start to add those spices and things that help us better digest our foods. And like you said, some people, some people really don't ever do well, with a lot of raw foods. Other people there are people out there who can absolutely thrive on eating lots of raw foods and they have super, super hearty, strong digestion and they can metabolize that really well. But But for a lot of us, our digestion is a bit more erratic and a bit less hearty. And we we do better to cook things and and add things to them to stoke our digestion.

Tonya:

Yeah, I tried. I tried the raw foods, you know, diet a couple of different times. And it was it was actually painful. Yeah, it was very, very painful for me. So that's when I realized that you know, we really need to pay attention to our individual constitutions.

Daphnie Leigh:

Absolutely. And that's such a an important point and again, is highly sensitive people big because we tend to be highly sensitive on a variety of different levels within our body and our mind and our nervous system. And so it's really helpful to pay attention to those things and honor our own body. You know, regardless of where, you know, my super Hardy Kapha dosha partner, you know, Ken has a really strong digestion, he can go a lot longer between meals and stay super grounded, and not me. And so that's really helpful when we start to pay attention to that. So what are some of the foods that we should eat during fall?

Tonya:

Yeah, and like we've been saying, so in general, we want to eat you know, warm kind of heavier foods, adding maybe some healthy oils to our foods, so olive oil, sometimes coconut oil, avocado oil, maybe ghee, if you have access to that, which is something that's a real staple in our Veda and in cooking from the continent of India, and then some other things. So the kinds of fruits, bananas, avocados, cooked apples and pears like we've been talking about making your own apple sauce for example. That's a great way to add that the nutrients of an apple right but in a cooked way. So tomatoes, citrus, like oranges and grapefruit. Vegetables, typically you want to look for vegetables that have stems on them. So and you really want to try unless unless you know for sure you you really digest raw vegetables well. You really want to kind of stick more with the cooked foods. So all the squashes that are in season, you know coming up so spaghetti acorn, sweet potatoes, those are one of my favorites. regular potatoes, yams, turnips, pumpkin, of course, we not talk about pumpkin in October, when we're recording this. Grains are good. We rice oats for oatmeal.

Daphnie Leigh:

Yeah, there's like one bringing up that thing. When I was talking earlier about our digestive system, and that we have we produce more digestive enzymes at this time of the year to literally be able to better better digest and metabolize things like wheat, which is when like the you know where the harvest is come in. This would be normally the time of the year that we would eat things like that. Before we had year round access to it. And of course there's always going to be exceptions. I mean, some people never do well with gluten and Yep, yeah, because celiacs don't start eating gluten. Yeah. But yeah, and and if you think about it, things like oh, I think of like oats and they're when you cook oats, they have that kind of like slimy quality you know what I mean? Like they create that kind of gel slimy consistency that just oozes with the thought of like adding moisture

Tonya:

so coating your insides

Daphnie Leigh:

that ugly and so if you think about that along with like you said like with the oils that that can bring in that kind of element of moisture and groundedness that we need at this time of the year.

Tonya:

Yeah, for sure. And things like knots, you know, nut butters, peanut butter, almond butter, all those kinds of things. And then we talked about you know, adding some oils to your food you know, the ghee, the olive oil letter if you eat butter, but just kind of making sure that I know for me personally, this is something I really have to be careful navigating, um, on how much I consume because if you have high cholesterol, it's something you really want to keep an eye on. So you know, always check with your doctor or know your you know, your personal history around anything we talk about, of course, but I know for me in particular, this is something that that I'm very mindful about when it comes to using the fats and the oils in my food

Daphnie Leigh:

salutely And that if we are you know, when with all of these things we want to consider are like our overall inflammation levels too because, you know, where where things really start to become problematic is if we have a lot of info limitation in our system, and then we increase our cholesterol levels and things like that, then we can really start to increase risks of diseases and things happening. And we also need a certain amount of cholesterol. And that's, I know, I know, for our brain health, and it's important for there, it's like there's this balance with all these things. And we can like nuts, you mentioned nuts and nut butters and things like that, that this could be a good time of the year for that. And if you think about it, you know, fall heading into winter, naturally, this would be the time of the year, the best time of the year to add in an even to create more insulation on our own bodies as we head into winter time where we need those reserves. And we need to keep our bodies warmer. Whereas when springtime rolls around, that's the best time to really cut the excess fats and oils and things out of our diet so that we can lighten up as we head into summer. Are those natural seasonal cycles, we can we can learn a lot by I don't know, I look at like the bears have been coming down out of the mountains where I live and they're hunkered down in our AP are pear orchards and with all the apples on everyone's trees, and they're out and about getting fat for winter. And this is, you know, that's this would be the normal time of the year, when, if we're going to put on a little extra weight, this would be the time to do it.

Tonya:

Yeah, and just, you know, just to kind of tack on to the end of that is that, you know, we're talking about eating seasonally, of course. And if we, if we had a diet, you know, like, like a bear, for example, that was just eating, you know, things from nature, right, then we would follow that natural cycle of, you know, gaining and losing, but it's when we bring in all the processed foods, you know, kind of adding that element, right, is where we really can start to, to get a little bit lost.

Daphnie Leigh:

Yeah, most of us have have definitely gotten to where we have a lot more of the feasting without the famine periods. Yes, it is, so to speak, that we're not going through those natural cycles of you know, and I mean, some of us, some people do, because they like, Yo Yo diet and stuff, but that's not healthy for us either. There's there's a balance to be found with all of these things. And I'm not talking like extremes. Go get yourself really fat as you head into winter and then and then starve yourself in the spring. No, no, no, don't do that. But yeah, there's definitely a balance to be found. And most of us nowadays, like most of us don't even know what it feels like to be hungry anymore. Because like we get a niggling or it's just like oh, I'll just have a little snack that we we've gotten a lot better at the feasting part and

Tonya:

unprocessed food is cheap, fast and easy. Absolutely. So it's a lot it's a lot to navigate its allies. And especially but going back to the foods and things you know, for me spices right spices are one of the speaking of cheap fast and easy it's one of my favorite ways to add flavor to my foods so focusing this year you know this time of year on warming spices like we've been talking about cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, all those kinds of smells that you might might associate with you know, baking and things like that you can easily put these spices into savory foods as well. All kinds of stuff like that they're awesome for that and just experimenting, right because like I said, spices are a great way to add flavor and there are relatively inexpensive and so I think it makes it easier to kind of play around in the kitchen you know and see how cinnamon is going to taste on that butternut squash or you know, whatever it is throw some throw some ginger into your soup and and see how it tastes. You know, I think it's a pretty easy, fairly easy way to kind of experiment with that. And then I also love tea. So any kind of tea is great for me all year round, but especially Yes.

Daphnie Leigh:

For those of you watching on YouTube, I'm sitting here I've been sipping on my tea the whole time so I'm never far from my tea cup.

Tonya:

Oh no, it's such a tea is very grounding for me as well. I just love it as part of my daily routine but you know, ginger, lemongrass, mint. All these things are great for this time of year. And also think about the temperature that you're consuming it at. Right. So typically, room temperature or warmer is good for this time of year fall going into winter. And Cool, cool liquids can also actually make our digestive system a little bit more sluggish to

Daphnie Leigh:

you know, Tonya, I heard someone put it recently, and I'll just say, because right next to my tea cup is my insulated container that is filled with hot water that I sip on throughout the day. And I heard, I heard it put recently, in terms and some people the thought of drinking just hot water plain. If you've you know, if you have if you're not used to it, like it might sound really off putting, we'll put it that way. But I love it now. And I do it all the time and is what I keep meaning just is that there what I heard was like, you wouldn't wash your dishes with cold water. And in the same way, that's kind of like the difference between drinking hot water and warm water versus, you know, drinking ice water or cold water all the time, that when we think about I mean, really we're drinking water to flush our system and to keep ourselves healthy and to nourish our tissues and all of that, and that our body can do it better with with hot water and and it's actually like going to have a better cleansing effect. So if you have we mentioned earlier a common a common imbalance people can experience at this time of the year is constipation and, and one great thing that we can do is get up in the morning and really like drink a good amount of hot warm to hot water. Sometimes, like get up and drink a quart if you're if especially if you're if you're really getting sluggish with your digestion or you're having constipation that we want to hydrate in a really efficient and effective way. Mm hmm.

Tonya:

Yeah, for sure. I love that idea of what I do sometimes is all put maybe like a little bit of lemon, maybe some like a cinnamon stick or something in my warm water in the morning. So just to give it a little bit of a little bit of flavor. That's something I like to do as well. But yeah, so drinking and I also you mentioned washing the dishes. And I also think of any use like a shower to like a if you take a cold shower, right? Everything's going to contract. Yeah. Clean a hot shower, everything's going to kind of like relax and flow your pores are going to open. So that's another another way I think about it when you talked about washing the dishes for sure.

Daphnie Leigh:

Yeah, that we want that same effect internally. Although we don't often think of

Tonya:

it that way. I know it's all connected. Yes.

Daphnie Leigh:

So you know, Autumn is really a great time of year just to start noticing and assessing for yourself, like what is your body need? And you know, and so we've talked about this idea of like, like increase creases like and opposites balance. And so if you're noticing that you're getting a lot of dry skin, and that you're not sleeping well and you're feeling ungrounded or you're getting constipated, then how can you add more grounding, warming, heating things, to, you know, to help bring yourself back to balance. And there, you know, in many ways, we're starting to, in many ways, we're starting to slow down at this time of the year as we we think about it's starting to get darker earlier and it's staying darker longer in the morning. And so there's that natural kind of slowdown that wants to happen. But we can start to be a little bit more intentional about creating some time to actually listen to and ask ourselves like what does my body need right now? What does my mind need right now? And man, we're also going to be we're heading into the holidays. Right? So if you if you happen to step into just about any retail store, it's kind of shocking when you start seeing the the holiday wares coming out here in the US they started selling Halloween candy like over a month ago and it's right next to the Christmas stuff. Yeah. So as we head into this time of the year, it can be easier and easier to start to overindulge or to add like a lot of excess sugar We're into our diet. And so we want to be mindful of that. And, you know, just to kind of, to recap, nature is always going through different cycles and different rhythms. And we are too. And so as highly sensitive people, it really kind of puts us in this unique position of being able to listen more easily and to tune in more easily to our own body, as well as to really pay attention to what's going on around us, in our own environment and seasonally. But we have to pay attention, and we have to develop our awareness around these things. And so, you know, an important thing to consider is how do we develop that awareness? How do we build that into our lives more, and so we can start to simply slow down, we can get curious about what we're actually feeling, you know, both in our physical body and emotionally, and we can really pay attention to the signals that our body gives us, you know, if we're, if we're starting to not sleep, well, we're we're noticing that our joints are getting stiffer, and we're getting lots of popping in our joints and a lot of air and space stuff going on in there. That rather than just ignoring that, or just thinking like, Oh, yep, chain, you know, change of seasons, my joints hurt now, instead, it could be like, Oh, change of seasons, my joints are starting to talk to me more. And are there things that I could do to better support my body as the seasons change? So we can get really curious, we can make sure that we're taking enough time for rest. And this is so so very important. I mean, for everyone, but for highly sensitive people, we need extra rest, we need more time to recover. And, and we need because we often are so in tune with the people around us, we sometimes forget to listen to our own body, and to give ourselves what we need. And so you know, we need we need to take that time to slow down and rest so that we can check in and ask ourselves, you know, hey, how you doing? What do you need right now?

Tonya:

I think I just wanted to add to something that I use that some people might find helpful is to keep it just keep a list, you don't even have to journal but just you know, keep a list of you know, Monday, Apple stomachache, or you know what I mean, just because I know with me two weeks or roll around, I think I really want that apple. Yeah, forget, right that eating a raw apple may not agree with me. So even just keeping a list that you can kind of refer back to about different foods that you're eating and how they might be affecting your body. Yes, I think can be super, super helpful, especially as we get more into the this time of season the holidays, we can be more distracted by things that are going on. So I think that's a easy way for us to really kind of tap into that, that awareness as well.

Daphnie Leigh:

Absolutely. I'm so glad you brought that up. Because I know for myself, I've gone through times where I have literally just kept a little one of those little tiny notebooks with me, where each day I'll write down you know, the basic foods that I'm eating along with the symptoms that I'm experiencing, especially when I've noticed that I've started to get you know that something's off or I know something's off, but I don't know exactly what's causing it, that then I can start to see patterns of like, when I eat this, that seems to happen more often than not. And that can help us to make healthier choices for ourselves because we are all different. And and our body the need and the needs of our bodies change. And there are some times when we can tolerate some things and other times when we don't. So yeah, this has been well, this has been a great topic. And is there anything else there that you want to add right now?

Tonya:

I think you really wrapped it up nicely. Yeah, it's such a it's so interesting, I think especially you know, for both of us because we we do work, you know, with nutrition and all of that but just to give, you know, we just want to give for everyone who's listening, just you know, a little bit of a little bit of thought that it really isn't that difficult to make these kinds of small changes, and you may be even doing them a lot of them already without even realizing it. And just, if you if you start to notice it, just, you know, kind of ride that wave, I guess. And really, you know, think about maybe keeping a list and all of that, because what we put in our bodies, affects everything else that that goes on with us body, mind, spirit, all of that, especially as highly sensitive people.

Daphnie Leigh:

Absolutely. That is so important. What great food for thought for today, Tanya, you know, that is so true. And getting literally whatever we're eating is creating the tissues of our bodies. And we want to create healthy tissues. Yes. So for you know, for those of you listening, if you are interested in going deeper, feel free to come join me to come join Daphne in the highly sensitive and strong Facebook community. We'll put a link to that down in the show notes. Also, don't forget to check the links. If you'd like to go take a dosha quiz so you can learn more about your own your Vedic constitution. And we're also going to put a link where you can grab a free copy of just a simple seasonal food guide. Along with that, that resource that Tonya talked about earlier, where you can learn about what foods are in season in your location if you happen to live in the US. Yeah, all those resources

Tonya:

are going to be available in the shownotes. And we're super excited to to share them with you. Thank you so much for listening for spending this time with us. As always, we are so grateful. We know that your time is precious. And we just have such gratitude that you chosen to spend this time with us if you have any questions, definitely mentioned her Facebook group. But if you have any specific questions for us, or if you're interested in learning more about our work in nutrition, or any of the other things that we do with either Daphne or myself, Tanya, you can always reach out to us. We'd love to chat with you if you have questions. Or just send this message to say hi, because we love to hear from you. And if you're enjoying the podcast, please share it with a friend if you think that they'll find value in it. And if you have a moment we'd be so appreciative. If you could leave us a quick review on pod chaser iTunes, wherever you listen. It really helps us to reach more sensitive people like you. And don't forget to subscribe so you won't miss any of the good stuff. And we will see you next time. Bye everybody.

Daphnie Leigh:

Bye bye.

Tonya Rothe:

Thank you for spending time with us on the sensitivity rising podcast. Please reach out to us with any questions or topic ideas you'd like to learn more about. New episodes are released Wednesdays and if you're enjoying the podcast, please take a moment to leave a review and share it with others. You can click the Listen link in the show notes to subscribe for free on your platform of choice. And we'll see you next time.

About the Podcast

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Sensitivity Rising
Where Highly Sensitive People learn to turn down the noise and tune into their inner guidance systems.

About your hosts

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Tonya Rothe

Tonya is a Certified Professional Holistic Wellness Guide, trauma survivor, depression thriver & Highly Sensitive joy seeker living in the Pacific Northwest, specializing in Sensitivity Focused Yoga & Nutrition for Body Mind Spirit.
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Daphnie Leigh

Daphnie is a Clinical Health Coach, Ayurvedic Lifestyle Coach, and an advanced yoga and mindfulness meditation teacher who specializes in helping highly sensitive people break free from anxiety while cultivating a peaceful mind and healthy body.